Get cheap bulk ammo at Lucky Gunner

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

A simple graphic on suturing techniques

After all, why survive if your just going to die

A simple graphic on suturing techniques

Postby medicmike » Sun Jul 07, 2013 8:40 am

Image
"Stand your ground. Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here."
Captain John Parker at Lexington Green
User avatar
medicmike
Survivor
Survivor
 
Posts: 777
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 10:30 am
Location: Southern Oregon

Re: A simple graphic on suturing techniques

Postby fastback65 » Sun Jul 07, 2013 8:55 am

Thanks for this. I am going to print and laminate a card for my BOB. I have read that a pig foot is good to practice on.
"Never, under any circumstances, ever become a refuge... Die if you must, but die on your home turf with your face to the wind, not in some stinking hellhole 2,000 kilometers away, among people you neither know nor care about." - Ragnar Benson
User avatar
fastback65
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1831
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:50 am
Location: Dixie

Re: A simple graphic on suturing techniques

Postby medicmike » Sun Jul 07, 2013 10:59 am

Chicken is pretty good for practice too.
"Stand your ground. Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here."
Captain John Parker at Lexington Green
User avatar
medicmike
Survivor
Survivor
 
Posts: 777
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 10:30 am
Location: Southern Oregon

Re: A simple graphic on suturing techniques

Postby Muleskinner » Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:12 pm

fastback65 wrote:Thanks for this. I am going to print and laminate a card for my BOB.


That's a great idea FB65. Think I will follow your lead on this.

I have a question, though. I have only first responder training (from work) so I have no training in this field. How does someone with little/no experience know which kind of suture to use in a given situation. I see that some are for under the skin (deep wounds ?) but other than that, which should be used or does it really matter if a wound can just be closed?
"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not." ~Thomas Jefferson

"Being prepared is sometimes inconvenient, but not being prepared is always inconvenient." - Fred Choate

Molon Labe!
User avatar
Muleskinner
Master Prepper
Master Prepper
 
Posts: 262
Joined: Tue May 08, 2012 7:45 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: A simple graphic on suturing techniques

Postby fastback65 » Tue Jul 09, 2013 8:23 am

MS, there is some excellent tutorials on this site, http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1824895-overview.
There are also strong copyright warnings, so to be safe, I am just posting the link. I went to the site and copy/pasted the text to a word document and saved it.
"Never, under any circumstances, ever become a refuge... Die if you must, but die on your home turf with your face to the wind, not in some stinking hellhole 2,000 kilometers away, among people you neither know nor care about." - Ragnar Benson
User avatar
fastback65
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1831
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:50 am
Location: Dixie

Re: A simple graphic on suturing techniques

Postby medicmike » Tue Jul 09, 2013 10:07 am

Many wounds in the field are better off left open to scar, if you suture up a non sterile wound you can be buying much more trouble once infection sets in. If no one has seen septic shock it is a terrible way to die. This is one reason I cringe every time I see someone posting on a survival board with a recommendation of plugging a gunshot wound with a tampon. Now maxi pads on the other hand, do make a great field expedient trauma dressing.

Oftentimes, butterfly closures are a great alternative to suturing, Super Glue can also be used for wound closure, I carry Dermabond in my kit which is just a medical grade Super Glue.

I do have some advantage over many in the medical field. My XYL is a critical care RN that is working toward her NP and I have about 10 years in pre-hospital and a couple years in the ER as a Tech. I am certainly no doctor though, nor do I play one on TV :)

I would add a quick anecdote about what can be done with sutures. During my internship I spent a number of days in the operating room, primarily to work with the anesthesiologists to practice intubation. I did get to watch a number of amazing surgeries. One Thoracic Surgeon had me grab a stool and stand over the patient during a triple bypass (CABG or Cabbage as they are called). He was great and gave me a wonderful tour of the anatomy. What amazed me most was the fact that they could take a section of the Saphenous Vein from the leg and butt-stitch it to replace a chunk of artery on the heart. It was amazing to watch him work with the very small and precise sutures needed to perform this. When the bypass machine was taken off and the vascular system re-pressurized, the darned thing didn't leak! I was very impressed, I know there was no way I could get away with that on a piece of fuel line lol.
"Stand your ground. Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here."
Captain John Parker at Lexington Green
User avatar
medicmike
Survivor
Survivor
 
Posts: 777
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 10:30 am
Location: Southern Oregon

Re: A simple graphic on suturing techniques

Postby Muleskinner » Tue Jul 09, 2013 4:25 pm

medicmike wrote: 1. Many wounds in the field are better off left open to scar, if you suture up a non sterile wound you can be buying much more trouble once infection sets in.

2. Oftentimes, butterfly closures are a great alternative to suturing, Super Glue can also be used for wound closure, I carry Dermabond in my kit which is just a medical grade Super Glue.

3. I know there was no way I could get away with that on a piece of fuel line lol.


1. Experienced this recently... Wife recently had surgery on her wrist for carpal tunnel syndrome. Wound was healing ok when she fell and the wound split open again. Rather than re-stitch the wound, her surgeon elected to let it heal itself. Questioned the doctor but he was adamant about no stitches. It seems to be taking longer to heal than the surgery on her other wrist due to this. Even though it is an open wound, there has been no infection. She keeps it clean with soap and water only per doctors orders. No Neosporin, alcohol, or anything but soap and water. I would never have thought that it would heal without infection being such a large, open wound. It had split open 3/4 the length of the original incision.

2. Have a few of the butterfly closures in the household med supply kit. They do work well. Will check into getting some of the Dermabond, too.

3. That's why I keep a few dbl. ended barbed fittings and worm gear clamps in the ole' toolbox ;)


FB65 - That is an excellent article you recommended. Saved it for future reference. Thanks
"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not." ~Thomas Jefferson

"Being prepared is sometimes inconvenient, but not being prepared is always inconvenient." - Fred Choate

Molon Labe!
User avatar
Muleskinner
Master Prepper
Master Prepper
 
Posts: 262
Joined: Tue May 08, 2012 7:45 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: A simple graphic on suturing techniques

Postby medicmike » Tue Jul 09, 2013 6:19 pm

Muleskinner wrote:2. Have a few of the butterfly closures in the household med supply kit. They do work well. Will check into getting some of the Dermabond, too.

FB65 - That is an excellent article you recommended. Saved it for future reference. Thanks


Regular old Super Glue will work in a pinch. I usually keep a half-dozen or so Dollar Store packs handy.

At a campout with the military vehicle club we had a young fellow that cracked his chin pretty hard on the turret of the M60 tank we were running around the sand dunes on. His dad brought him to my tent, looked all the world to me like he was going to need to go to the ER for stitches. We had Neurologist in the club (he was a Viet Nam MASH hospital vet) and he looked at it for me and said to just close it up with butterfly closures. Cleaned the wound with some saline and iodine solution and closed him up. Saw him next year and the scar was almost gone, the young fellow was a little disappointed that he didn't have a "battle scar" to show off :D

And I will give a +1 on the article from FB!
"Stand your ground. Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here."
Captain John Parker at Lexington Green
User avatar
medicmike
Survivor
Survivor
 
Posts: 777
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 10:30 am
Location: Southern Oregon

Re: A simple graphic on suturing techniques

Postby fastback65 » Tue Jul 09, 2013 6:56 pm

I had a quadruple bypass about 6 years ago. No stitches on the leg or chest everything was glued.
"Never, under any circumstances, ever become a refuge... Die if you must, but die on your home turf with your face to the wind, not in some stinking hellhole 2,000 kilometers away, among people you neither know nor care about." - Ragnar Benson
User avatar
fastback65
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1831
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:50 am
Location: Dixie

Re: A simple graphic on suturing techniques

Postby medicmike » Tue Jul 09, 2013 7:07 pm

I also meant to add......I am glad your wife has healed up well!
"Stand your ground. Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here."
Captain John Parker at Lexington Green
User avatar
medicmike
Survivor
Survivor
 
Posts: 777
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 10:30 am
Location: Southern Oregon

Next

Return to Medical

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron