Get cheap bulk ammo at Lucky Gunner

Emergency Essentials/BePrepared

Mylar Bags

What and how to

Mylar Bags

Postby m1able » Thu Jan 03, 2013 7:38 am

How important are the mylar bags if you are storing rice or beans maybe spaghetti in new 5 gallon buckets with gamma lids. I know it can't hurt to have everything in mylar bags, just wondering about it. This will be my first time storing in buckets so any info would be highly appreciated.
m1able
Prepper
Prepper
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Mon May 07, 2012 8:44 am
Location: Brandon

Re: Mylar Bags

Postby fastback65 » Thu Jan 03, 2013 8:26 am

As I understand it, plastic buckets are gas permeable. That is to say, gases can pass trough the walls of the bucket. The mylar is not permeable and when it is used in conjunction with oxygen absorbers, the stored food is in a pretty much oxygen free state. For what it is worth, I place the mylar bag in a bucket, fill it but do not seal it and then place the bucket in a chest type freezer for at least 24 hours. This will supposedly kill any insect eggs or larvae that may be in the food to be stored. Then I take the bucket out of the freezer, let it return to room temperature, add the oxygen absorbers, and seal the mylar using an iron and a metal ruler. I will let you know in about 25 years how it works out.

I found this info on the web and there is are a couple of links to a couple of videos at the bottom.
fastback65


Mylar Foil® Oxygen Barrier Bags

In the food processing area, these bags are known as oxygen barrier bags. Many people refer to them as Mylar® Foil bags because the outer layer of the bag is Mylar® Foil, which is a brand name for the DuPont Corporation's polyester film.

OXYGEN BARRIER BAGS (Mylar®FOIL BAGS) will greatly increase the shelf stability of your food products. Polyethylene pails are not a true oxygen barrier by themselves. The oxygen transmission rate (OTR) is critical. For example, our bags have a transmission rate of 0.001 cc's of oxygen per square meter per 24 hours. A clear Mylar®/poly bag is 0.5 cc's/ square meter/ 24 hours. This means the Mylar/poly bag is 500 (FIVE HUNDRED!) times greater.

WARNING: Some companies and people will try to tell you that clear "FOODSAVER" bags are good for long term storage. THEY ARE NOT. For long term food storage you should use the mylar foil oxygen barrier bags.

How do I know if I have the right type of Mylar Foil™ bags?

This is an extremely good question. The Mylar® foil bags that are used for long-term food storage were originally designed for exporting Macadamia nuts in bulk. This bag is 4.3 mils thick and appears to look like aluminum foil. Although the Mylar® foil layer is transparent, long-term food storage bags are NEVER transparent. Here at Optimum Preparedness we sell only FDA approved food grade mylar foil oxygen barrier bags made for long term food storage.

Another type of Mylar® Foil with which many consumers are familiar is the "Mylar® Foil balloon" that is often sold at supermarkets for birthdays and other occasions. The industrial name for the Mylar® Foil balloon material (NOT the same as the bags we sell!!) is metalized polyester. This is product mostly cosmetic and has minimal oxygen barrier properties.

Any concerned individual should be very wary of an organization trying to promote "transparent" barrier bags as a food storage bag. Long-term food storage should never be one of them. (One good example to watch for is the US Military MRE products. The packaging material used to produce the MREs has a very high oxygen barrier.)

What is the worst that can happen if I do not use a Mylar Foil™ bag inside my pail?

First the plastic pail is not an oxygen barrier (like a #10 can is) so there is a slow transmission of oxygen through the polyethylene walls of the container over time. According to grain processors, the most common problem is insect infestation. Nothing will eliminate this as certainly as an oxygen barrier bag and an oxygen absorber. (Gas flushing will always leave 2-5% oxygen minimum.)

Also, since the oxygen absorber will actually remove 20.5 % of the air that is within the container, it is possible for the absorber to pull in the wall of the container (the vacuum effect) to such a degree that the lid separates from the pail.

IMPORTANT: IF THE LID, WHICH SHOULD HAVE A GASKET, SEPARATES FROM THE BUCKET ENOUGH TO CREATE EVEN A VERY VERY SMALL OPENING THE OXYGEN ABSORBER WILL BE DEPLETED WITHIN 72 hours MAXIMUM. THIS IS WHY THE HIGH QUALITY FOOD PACKERS USE A 4.3 MIL Mylar BAG INSIDE THEIR PLASTIC PAILS.


Video of packing with mylar
http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_ZA%20B105_A_name_E_Metallized%20Liner%20for%20Buckets

Better Video
http://www.shopsimplerliving.com/food_storage.html
"Never, under any circumstances, ever become a refuge... Die if you must, but die on your home turf with your face to the wind, not in some stinking hellhole 2,000 kilometers away, among people you neither know nor care about." - Ragnar Benson
User avatar
fastback65
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1831
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:50 am
Location: Dixie

Re: Mylar Bags

Postby m1able » Thu Jan 03, 2013 9:03 am

This is why I come here for info ! Thanks

The demonstration is for bulk storage which is great ! What I have on my mind is individual bags of rice and peas and the likes, yet still preserve them in the same way....my way of thinking is just getting out what I need when the time has come to start using the preserved goods. Would the oxygen absorber remove the air from the individual bags OK? or would I be better off opening each bag? I don't mean to make things difficult, just like having a sounding board.
m1able
Prepper
Prepper
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Mon May 07, 2012 8:44 am
Location: Brandon

Re: Mylar Bags

Postby fastback65 » Thu Jan 03, 2013 9:40 am

I packed 50 pounds of rice using my vacuum sealer and the regular bags. I made the bags about 4 pounds each and vacuumed them and sealed them. Then I put the individual bags inside a 6 gallon bucket with a Gamma lid and did not use an oxygen absorber. I use these bags to resupply the kitchen and not for long term storage. The LTS is the one with mylar bags. I did freeze the rice before I put it into the vacuum bags. We did this primarily, to take advantage of the savings of bulk buying. Another thing to consider is buying Super Pails from Emergency Essentials. This way you get the rice, beans, wheat, whatever, already professionally sealed in a 6 gallon bucket. We went this route with beans, because we could never find them in bulk locally. BTW, shipping is 9.95 no matter how much you order. An oxygen absorber for each bag might be an expense you could do without. I never priced the smaller absorbers, just the large ones.

http://beprepared.com/quickshoplist.asp_Q_c_E_79_A_name_E_Superpails

If you order from Emergency Essentials and use the link on this website, The site gets a "kickback" that helps pay the hosting fees. If you want, I will be glad to come over when you start packing and offer my assistance.
"Never, under any circumstances, ever become a refuge... Die if you must, but die on your home turf with your face to the wind, not in some stinking hellhole 2,000 kilometers away, among people you neither know nor care about." - Ragnar Benson
User avatar
fastback65
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1831
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:50 am
Location: Dixie

Re: Mylar Bags

Postby medicmike » Sat Jan 05, 2013 6:28 pm

Back before mylar was readily available we packed a couple thousand pounds of wheat in 5 gallon buckets, sealing them in a plastic garbage bag in side the bucket. We would place a chunk of dry ice that would melt, and the CO2 would displace the oxygen, once the dry ice melted we would close the plastic bag up tight and seal in the bucket. We checked a couple buckets after about 15 years and the wheat was still in great shape.

With easy access to mylar though, that would be the way to go. My son picked up a bunch of bags from Amazon for pretty cheap (I think he said around $1 ea in lots of 50).
"Stand your ground. Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here."
Captain John Parker at Lexington Green
User avatar
medicmike
Survivor
Survivor
 
Posts: 777
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 10:30 am
Location: Southern Oregon

Re: Mylar Bags

Postby fastback65 » Sun Jan 06, 2013 8:55 am

Mike, I read, that there was wheat found in one of the pyramids that was calculated to be sever thousand years old and it still had a 75% sprout rate. Wheat apparently keeps very well,
"Never, under any circumstances, ever become a refuge... Die if you must, but die on your home turf with your face to the wind, not in some stinking hellhole 2,000 kilometers away, among people you neither know nor care about." - Ragnar Benson
User avatar
fastback65
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1831
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:50 am
Location: Dixie

Re: Mylar Bags

Postby medicmike » Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:45 am

fastback65 wrote:Mike, I read, that there was wheat found in one of the pyramids that was calculated to be sever thousand years old and it still had a 75% sprout rate. Wheat apparently keeps very well,


I have heard that as well. It is a great long term storage staple!
"Stand your ground. Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here."
Captain John Parker at Lexington Green
User avatar
medicmike
Survivor
Survivor
 
Posts: 777
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 10:30 am
Location: Southern Oregon


Return to Survival Food

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron